Guide to Eventing


 

Eventing, formally called the ‘three day event’, takes place over four days at a major Championship. The senior major Championships cycle over a four-year Olympiad – an Olympic Games, a World Equestrian Games, and European Championships in the two years in between.  The youth teams (young rider, junior and pony) compete at European Championships each year.

Eventing is an all around test of horse and rider with three distinct tests, or phases, taking place on separate days, with the competitor riding the same horse throughout. 

AT AN OLYMPIC GAMES

The eventing competition takes places over four days: the first two days are dressage (half of the field compete on each day), followed by cross-country and then two showjumping rounds on the final day.

DRESSAGE:

Each horse and rider combination performs a dressage test in front of a panel of 3 judges. The judges’ scores are converted into penalty points, which are carried forward to the next stage of the competition (riders are aiming to achieve as low a dressage penalty score as possible).

CROSS COUNTRY:

In 2012 the course was 5,700m (approx) and contained between 42-45 jumping efforts. Every horse/rider combination will receive penalty points for jumping errors and for exceeding the optimum time; if they are penalised, these points are then added to the penalty points incurred during the dressage test to give a total score.

FIRST JUMPING ROUND:

The first round decides the placings of the team event; the winning team is the one with the lowest total number of penalty points, after adding together the scores from the three highest placed athletes in the team. Riders and horses are given penalty points for any jumping errors and time faults, which are added to their carried forward score from the dressage and cross-country rounds.

SECOND JUMPING ROUND:

This round decides the individual placings. The team scores from the first jumping round determines the top 25 athletes who go through to contest this round. The individual winner is the athlete with the lowest penalty score after penalty points incurred from all three phases (including any incurred in the second jumping round) have been totalled.

Visit the Rio 2016 Hub for more information

AT A EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS

With the 2015 FEI European Championships being held on home soil at Blair Castle, Scotland, Great Britain are eligible to send a squad of 12 athletes to represent Team GBR. The team competition will see four nominated riders contesting for GB, with the three best scores counting towards the final team placing. The remaining eight athletes compete for individual titles only. 

DRESSAGE:

The first two days of competition see the dressage phase, where all riders complete a predetermined test of movements in front of three judges. All judges award marks out of ten and, after combining the scores to give an overall percentage score, the score is then converted into penalty points (the higher the percentage the lower the penalty score). 

CROSS-COUNTRY:

On the third day of competition competitors tackle the cross-country course, where combinations are tested over a number of solid obstacles. Carrying forward their dressage score, penalties are incurred during this phase for a refusal, run-out (at a fence) or for exceeding the time allowed. Falls of horse or rider result in elimination. 

SHOWJUMPING:

The third and final phase is the showjumping, which takes place in the same arena as the dressage phase. Carrying forward their scores from cross-country, penalties are further added for knocking down an obstacle, a refusal at a fence or exceeding the optimum time; riders can be eliminated for a second refusal or a fall. The individual winner is the combination with the lowest number of penalty points; in the team event, the three best placed team riders scores are added together to calculate the overall result. 

AT A WORLD EQUESTRIAN GAMES

DRESSAGE:

The first two days of competition see the dressage phase, where all riders complete a predetermined test of movements in front of three judges. All judges award marks out of ten and, after combining the scores to give an overall percentage score, the score is then converted into penalty points (the higher the percentage the lower the penalty score).

CROSS COUNTRY:

On the third day of competition competitors tackle the cross-country course, where combinations are tested over a number of solid obstacles. Carrying forward their dressage score, penalties are incurred during this phase for a refusal, run-out (at a fence) or for exceeding the time allowed. Falls of horse or rider result in elimination.

SHOWJUMPING:

The third and final phase is the showjumping, which takes place in the main arena in Caen. Carrying forward their scores from cross-country, penalties are further added for knocking down an obstacle, a refusal at a fence or exceeding the optimum time; riders can be eliminated for a second refusal or a fall. The individual winner is the combination with the lowest number of penalty points; in the team event, the three best placed team riders scores are added together to calculate the overall result. 

AT A NATIONS CUP

The Nations Cup series for eventing piloted in 2012, coming into force in 2013, and is open to all nations, competitions are run at CICO3* level. There are eight competitions throughout the eventing season where teams can pick up points from each one with the nations seven best scores counting.

Teams are made up of three or four athletes with the best three scores counting, the nation at the end of the season with the most points takes the series title.

Nations Cup Events for 2016:

From To Event
23 March  25 March  CICO3* Fontainebleau (France)
22 April  24 April  CICO3* Ballindenisk (Ireland)
26 May 29 May  CICO3* Houghton Hall (Great Britain)
24 June  26 June  CICO3* Strzegom (Poland)
8 July 10 July CICO3* The Plains (USA)
14 July 17 July CICO3* Aachen (Germany)
16 September  18 September  CICO3* Vairano (Italy)
22 September 25 September CICO3* Waregem (Belgium)
6 October  9 October  CICO3* Boekelo (Netherlands)


Visit the Nations Cup Hub for more information

 

Visit the British Eventing website for more information about the sport

Visit the FEI website for more information about the different disciplines and events