Brits in Action: 27.09.2016

27th Sep 2016

JUMPING

CSIO5* Nations Cup Barcelona, Spain:

In the Furusiyya FEI Nations Cup final, Great Britain claimed second place after a tightly fought contest with Germany who just edged the victory. The British jumping team of Nick Skelton (Big Star, owned by Gary and Beverley Widdowson), Michael Whitaker (Viking, owned by Melissa Braybrooke), Scott Brash (Ursulla XII, owned by Lady Harris and Lady Kirkham) and Jessica Mendoza (Spirit T, owned by Sarah Mendoza) produced three clears between them on Saturday to head into a jump off with Germany with both teams posting 0 faults on the board.

Individual Olympic Gold medallists, Nick Skelton and Big Star entered the arena for Britain in the jump off and produced yet another superb clear in 41.57 seconds. Marcus Ehning and Pret A Tout came forward for Germany and also went clear, stopping the clock on 39.80 seconds to seal the top spot for Germany.

In the El Periódico Trophy, John Whitaker claimed second place with Echo of Light, owned by Team Harmony. The pair recorded a clear round in 74.64 seconds but Ireland’s, Kenny Darragh and Fixdesign Funke van't Heike took the victory after posting a time of 74.06 seconds.

Scott Brash was also on the podium over the weekend in the Queen’s Cup with Lady Harris and Lady Kirkham’s, Hello Guvnor. Five combinations recorded a double clear after 15 came forward for the jump off; Scott and his mount produced a time of 41.70 seconds to take third place whilst the win went to Marcus Ehning and Funky Fred.

Full Results

British Showjumping’s Full Report

 

EVENTING

CCIO3* Nations Cup Waregem, Belgium:

In the penultimate leg of the FEI Nations Cup Eventing series, Great Britain claimed second place out in Belgium after climbing up from fifth after the dressage to second following four clear cross country rounds from Izzy Taylor (Trevidden, owned by Dr Patricia Turner), Laura Collett (Cooley Again, owned by Maggie Sargent), Tom Jackson (Dusty, owned by Susan Jenkins) and Jodie Amos (Soltair Justice, owned by Emma Forsyth). The win went to Germany whilst France took third.

All of the top three have a chance of sealing the title in the final leg at Boekelo in The Netherlands next month.

Full Results

FEI Junior and Young Rider European Championships Montelibretti, Italy:

The British junior team took third place in the final phase of the Junior and Young Riders European Championships after an exciting weekend of eventing. For a second successive year, the British team made it on to the podium after fantastic performances from Felicity Collins (RSH Contendor), Phoebe Locke (Union Fortunus), Richard Coney (Kananaskis) and Bubby Upton (Eros DHI).

British Eventing’s Full Report

 

CARRIAGEDRIVING

FEI European Championships for Young Drivers Schildau, Germany:

There were a number of great results for Great Britain’s young drivers out in Germany. In the Children’s class, Colette Hodsworth took third place after starting the competition well posting a good dressage score in the combined single pony event with Pepper. In the Junior, Emily Viller claimed third place with pony Rangemore Ryan whilst her team mate Megan Wheeldon finished sixth with Penraven Prince.

Great Britain finished sixth in the team competition (Colette Hodsworth, Katy Alvis, Emily Viller, Stephanie Milner and Tara Wilkinson), with good performances coming from the drivers.

British Carriagedriving’s blog

Full Results

 

CSI stands for Concours de Saut International and is essentially an international showjumping competiton and as with dressage, the higher the star rating (*), the more prestigous the show.

CCI stands for Concours Complet International and is an International three day event with the phases taking place in the order of dressage, cross country and showjumping. CIC stands for Concours International Combine and is an international one date event with dressage the first phase and either showjumping or cross country may be the final of the three phases. Competitions are given a star rating (*) in terms of difficulty; the higher the star, the higher the level of training and skill required.